June 5th through 22nd 2014

The Warehouse Gallery 

THE PROJECTS

623 Bergen Street Brooklyn, NY 11238

oUR SPONSORS

The Atlantic Yards project is located on 22 acres of Brooklyn, stretching from the intersection of Flatbush and Atlantic Avenues east to Vanderbilt Avenue, The megaproject, being developed by Forest City Ratner Companies (FCRC) and the New York State Empire State Development Corporation (ESDC), includes the Barclays Center arena and 16 residential and commercial towers. With an estimated budget of $5 billion, Atlantic Yards is the largest single-source development in New York City history. 


On December 20, 2006, the state’s Public Authorities Control Board voted to approve Forest City Ratner’s proposal to build more than 6 million square feet of housing, retail, and entertainment facilities. At the time of approval, there were still several pending court cases challenging the state’s right to seize land by condemnation through eminent  domain. Opponents of the project complained of an approval process tainted by cronyism, sweetheart deals and billions of dollars in hidden public subsidies. Because Atlantic Yards is being executed under the New York State Urban Development Corporation (UDC) law, developers have been able to override New York City regulations for public review and a City Council vote in order to proceed with construction. 

On March 1, 2010, a State Supreme Court Justice gave a ruling to seize property inside of the Atlantic Yards footprint, clearing the way for development. Groundbreaking for the Barclays Center Arena occurred on March 9, 2010. To date, only Phase I, incorporating the Barclays Center Arena and the adjacent B2 residential tower, has progressed.


The “Atlantic Yards: Five Proposals” exhibit will show five alternative designs for the Phase II portion of the FCRC scheme. Phase II includes the three blocks east of 6th Avenue, and is slated to receive 4,278,000 S.F. of residential space (4,320 units), 156,000 S.F. of retail space, and 1,324 parking spaces. Each of the five schemes incorporates the approved bulk and square footage in order to present a parallel comparison with the FCRC plan. 

​The projects explore the site’s development potential while respecting historic scale and context, activating public-private space interaction, and integrating characteristics of the urban streets that surround the site.  Each project aims to underline possibilities to create:

- meaningful public space within the development

 - relationship to the adjacent urban context

- a sustainable and healthful environment

​Each project accepts the benefits of high-density, high-rise urban development located adjacent to existing urban infrastructure as a sustainable approachto development.


The five proposals are intended to illustrate alternative architectural possibilities to the community through schemes that are equally profitable for the developer. The schemes will show that the proposed density is not inherently problematic if distributed properly on the site. The exhibition will open up a dialogue about the site’s potential, giving the community a deeper understanding of architectural and urban planning possibilities to properly develop one of the most significant large scale sites in New York City.
4,320 units of housing, distributed evenly on the site, at a density of 220 units per acre.
Birds eye view of the Atlantic Yards Site: 22 acres of prime real estate in the heart of brownstone Brooklyn
The master plan, approved in 2006
The Atlantic Yards project is located on 22 acres of Brooklyn, stretching from the intersection of Flatbush and Atlantic Avenues east to Vanderbilt Avenue, The megaproject, being developed by Forest City Ratner Companies (FCRC) and the New York State Empire State Development Corporation (ESDC), includes the Barclays Center arena and 16 residential and commercial towers. With an estimated budget of $5 billion, Atlantic Yards is the largest single-source development in New York City history. 


On December 20, 2006, the state’s Public Authorities Control Board voted to approve Forest City Ratner’s proposal to build more than 6 million square feet of housing, retail, and entertainment facilities. At the time of approval, there were still several pending court cases challenging the state’s right to seize land by condemnation through eminent  domain. Opponents of the project complained of an approval process tainted by cronyism, sweetheart deals and billions of dollars in hidden public subsidies. Because Atlantic Yards is being executed under the New York State Urban Development Corporation (UDC) law, developers have been able to override New York City regulations for public review and a City Council vote in order to proceed with construction. 

On March 1, 2010, a State Supreme Court Justice gave a ruling to seize property inside of the Atlantic Yards footprint, clearing the way for development. Groundbreaking for the Barclays Center Arena occurred on March 9, 2010. To date, only Phase I, incorporating the Barclays Center Arena and the adjacent B2 residential tower, has progressed.


The “Atlantic Yards: Five Proposals” exhibit will show five alternative designs for the Phase II portion of the FCRC scheme. Phase II includes the three blocks east of 6th Avenue, and is slated to receive 4,278,000 S.F. of residential space (4,320 units), 156,000 S.F. of retail space, and 1,324 parking spaces. Each of the five schemes incorporates the approved bulk and square footage in order to present a parallel comparison with the FCRC plan. 

​The projects explore the site’s development potential while respecting historic scale and context, activating public-private space interaction, and integrating characteristics of the urban streets that surround the site.  Each project aims to underline possibilities to create:

- meaningful public space within the development

 - relationship to the adjacent urban context

- a sustainable and healthful environment

​Each project accepts the benefits of high-density, high-rise urban development located adjacent to existing urban infrastructure as a sustainable approachto development.


The five proposals are intended to illustrate alternative architectural possibilities to the community through schemes that are equally profitable for the developer. The schemes will show that the proposed density is not inherently problematic if distributed properly on the site. The exhibition will open up a dialogue about the site’s potential, giving the community a deeper understanding of architectural and urban planning possibilities to properly develop one of the most significant large scale sites in New York City.